Monthly Musings: Appreciating April

Before we move into May, here are a few things I’ve appreciated in April:

  • Chris Tiegreen – I think Chris will be featuring here pretty much all year. Here’s my favourite (and challenging) quote from April (13):

If we want to hear God’s voice, we need to understand that He will not speak so definitely that no faith is required to follow; yet He will speak definitely enough for faith to have some direction. The key for us is to move forward when we think we’ve heard him. Some of us don’t do that. We wait until our hearts are absolutely certain – a waiting that never comes to an end because, underneath it, there is a fear of acting on faith. But God is looking not simply for our ability to hear. He wants a believing response.

  • For a limited time only, the Hungry Hippo Board Game Cafe has set up shop in Hindley Street, Adelaide (next to Uni SA). The cafe has shelves and shelves of games to choose from, and plenty of options on the food menu too. If you like board games and a fun night out with friends this cafe is worth a visit.
  • Apparently Google didn’t like my old blog theme – which it deemed as “not mobile friendly.” So Flourish! got a makeover with a theme called Penscratch. I rather like it and I hope you do too – especially if you’re reading from a mobile device.
  • I was reminded how photography helps me to look at my surroundings differently, to pay attention and look for things I might not otherwise see in the busyness of life. And it’s a great way to slow down and just breathe.
  • Last, but by no means least, I’ve been captivated by Jenn Johnson’s song In Over My Head. It’s on the Bethel Music worship album We Will Not Be Shaken which I mentioned in Monthly Musings for January. It’s a song that speaks to my heart and challenges me at the same time. Check out this video of Jenn talking about writing the song:

And here’s the whole song:


What did you appreciate in April?

How We Can All Learn from the Creativity of a Child

Recently I’ve been pondering the significance of dreaming (and not just about a holiday to New Zealand).

What might we create from the power of our dreams (the day dreams and the sleeping kind)? What might the future look like if we’re willing to dream, willing to imagine something that doesn’t yet exist, willing to pursue it into reality?

How often do we relegate dreaming to the domain of children? The ones who are too young, too innocent, too naive to know that dreaming is only a childhood game to be discarded by adults who ‘know better.’

Do we? Do we really know better?

Melissa Niu’s post, How We Can All Learn from the Creativity of a Child on photofocus.com is a reminder that children are sometimes the best teachers. They reveal the truths that we’ve forgotten, and restore to us a world of wonder and possibility.